10 Things NOT To Do in Brazil Download

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  • 18 de ago. de 2016

  • Get more Tips here! www.destinationtips.com Brazil is a beautiful country with attractive people, breathtaking sites, vibrant nightlife and of course the 2016 Olympics! The Zika virus is mainly transferred by mosquitoes and the highest probability of danger is posed to pregnant women, who should consider avoiding the area entirely. For everyone else, practice safe sex, wear lots of mosquito repellent, and wear long sleeves and pants. Don't Speak Spanish Many visitors travel to Brazil expecting to hear Spanish, but unlike its South American neighbors, Brazil’s native language is Portuguese! Don’t be that ignorant tourist attempting to converse with the locals in broken Spanish. Don't Flash the Cash Although Brazil is a relatively safe country, there are still many poor areas. Don’t wear your most expensive watch or wave around your new camera, because it will be pocketed. Don't Make the OK Sign! It is a highly offensive rude gesture in Brazil. However, thumbs up does mean something similar to okay, literally “beleza” or “beauty,” and is frequently used. Don't drink alone It is customary practice in Brazil to share your “estupidamente gelada” or 'stupidly cold beer' with others. Most bars only sell beer in 700 ml bottles and sometimes even strangers will show up with their own glasses. Don't Lose Your Consumption Card Many bars and nightclubs will operate using a consumption card, for each customer to record food and drink orders. Patrons are expected to settle their bill before leaving, and not doing so results in large fines. Don't be Impatient Things move at their own pace in Brazil. Long lines are common for everything from ATMs to grocery stores, so be prepared to wait patiently. Don't Forget the Amazon Don’t be afraid to venture out into the more remote areas. Take a trip to the Amazon Rainforest, Iguaçu Falls, smaller towns like Olinda and Ouro Preto or travel to the Fernando de Noronha archipelago to experience some of Brazil’s best kept secrets. Brazil is still a developing country, and you will come across extreme poverty, favelas, drug-torn cities and rude people. Don’t ever visit the favelas alone as they are run by drug lords and can be extremely dangerous. Don't Try to Enter Without a Visa! There are only a few visa exempt countries (mainly South American and Caribbean nations), the U.S. is not one of them. Brazil requires a visa for visitors traveling from Canada, and most European, Asian and African countries too. However, the process is very straightforward. Do you think Brazil has benefited economically by hosting the Olympics? Or has the Zika Virus held back too many tourists? Discuss Below.

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